Monterey

Draft Environmental Impact Report SR 68 (Holman Highway) Widening Project

Summary: 
State Route 68 in Monterey County is a two-lane undivided roadway that serves as the primary transportation facility between State Route 1 and the City of Pacific Grove, Pebble Beach and the Community Hospital of Monterey Peninsula. State Route 68 is heavily congested during the weekday afternoon period from 3pm to 6pm (City of Monterey). In order to reduce traffic congestion and the likelihood of accidents that could potentially delay emergency vehicle access to Community Hospital of Monterey Peninsula the 1993 Regional Transportation Plan recommended widening State Route 68 to four lanes from 0.2 km (0.1 miles) west of the Community Hospital of Monterey Peninsula intersection to south of the State Route 68 overpass at State Route 1. The following environmental document is a California Environmental Quality Act Environmental Impact Report in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act of 1970. Due to federal funding, this project is also subject to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, however it was determined that the project qualifies for a Programmatic Categorical Exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act (Federal Highway Administration/CalTrans). The major resources of concern for the proposed State Route 68 (Holman Highway) Widening Project are biological and visual resources.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The Holman Highway section of State Route 68 runs between the junction with State Route 1 and the City of Pacific Grove in Monterey County. It is the primary method of transportation between the City of Pacific Grove, The Pebble Beach Community, and the Community Hospital of The Monterey Peninsula (Draft EIR SR 68 Widening Project 2006). This section of highway is subject to heavy congestion and delays during the day, especially between the hours of 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM (Fehr & Peers Transportation Consultants). The 1993 Regional Transportation Plan recommended that SR 68 be widened from 2 lanes (1 Eastbound, 1 Westbound) to 4 lanes (2 in each direction). This recommendation was adopted in 1994. The project would put a 4 lane highway in the area 0.2 km (0.1 miles) west of the Community Hospital of Monterey Peninsula intersection to south of the State Route 68 overpass at State Route 1 (DEIR 2006).

PURPOSE/NEED

Keywords: 
Environmental Impact Report, Categorical Exclusion, mitigation
  County:

Light Brown Apple Moth Notice of Preparation of Draft EIR

Summary: 
The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Report (PEIR) to evaluate the effects of an eradication program for the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM) in nine counties (as listed below) of the state where infestations of the moth have been found. The LBAM has been found in several locations in the state of California during trapping programs. The LBAM attacks over 2,000 plants, which may have economic implications because of some of the plants' agricultural and horticultural values. In April 2007, preliminary emergency actions were taken in the Monterey-Santa Cruz area; additional actions are proposed for this area as well as the San Francisco Bay Area in 2008. The main method of eradication will be implemented by aerial spraying of a pheremone to disrupt the mating of the moths. The CDFA is working closely in conjunction with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in attempts to completely eradicate the LBAM from California.

Project Objectives and Methods:
The CDFA and USDA in consultation with the Light Brown Apple Moth Technical Working Group have developed an action plan with different strategies to eradicate the moth. The eradication strategy will primarily be accomplished by aerial application of pheromone to disrupt mating. The pheromone method will be used mostly in areas with denser populations. The pheromone functions by attracting males, preventing them from mating with females; the pheromone does not kill the moths. In addition to the aerial spraying, a ground treatment will be administered for small and isolated areas, to be used alone, or in addition to aerial spraying. The ground method uses twist ties to distribute the pheromone. Trapping methods will also be utilized in the project.

The LBAM program will monitor the aerial spraying for quality control and its effectiveness.

Issues to be addressed by the PEIR:

Keywords: 
Light Brown Apple Moth, Aerial spraying, Pheromones, Programmatic Environmental Impact Report
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